Amon: Apocalypse of Devilman

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Amon: Apocalypse of Devilman is known as the third OVA of the Devilman franchise. Even though it was released as an adaptation of Yu Kinutani’s Amon: The Darkside of Devilman, one can often find claims that it was meant to be a continuation of the two previous films, The Birth and The Demon Bird. Unfortunately I didn’t find any credible source that clarifies what the truth is. This review/commentary will focus on certain scenes from the OVA, then try to analyze and compare them to other Devilman adaptations. I should note that the movie doesn’t explain much of the story’s elements, thus those unfamiliar with the previous releases should probably skip this review. Continue reading

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Nekketsu men doing nekketsu things: An interview with Mane

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The original Getter Robo team. Left to right, Hayato Jin, Ryoma Nagare and Kuruma Benkei.

Introduction

Anime published in Japan during the 1970s-80s may often seem more simplistic than modern titles, yet one can’t deny that some of the most popular anime concepts and cliches were born at that time. Tough young men fighting for justice, beautiful strong women that accompany them, supernatural enemies from other dimensions and so on. Though it’s been a long time, there are still many fans of that era all over the world paying tribute to the awesomeness of retro anime.

One of them is Mane, a Spanish artist who currently resides in Japan. She designs fanarts  of titles like Getter Robo, Saint Seiya, Devilman, Ashita no Joe and Jojo’s Bizarre Adventure like only a small number of people can. It’s worth mentioning that she is among the few that make little adjustments on the original material instead of completely changing it. Thus, her work is very close to the retro feeling. That doesn’t stop her from adding her own perspective on the stories and their protagonists.

We’ve wanted to interview her for quite some time. Now, with the release of her latest doujinshi “Dynamic Fiesta Heroes”, it felt like the perfect chance to ask. Friendly, talented and full of enthusiasm, we present to you, Mane. Continue reading

Devilman: The Demon Bird

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Introduction

Devilman: The Demon Bird (デビルマン 妖鳥シレーヌ編) is the sequel to The Birth (デビルマン 誕生編) and it is the second of the three Devilman OVAs I wish to review. [1] Bolder than its ancestor when it comes to violence, action oriented and with improved animation, it is a worthy telling of Fudo Akira’s adventures.

The article is full of spoilers, so be warned. Continue reading

Devilman: The Birth

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Introduction

Devilman: The Birth (デビルマン 誕生編) is the first of the three Devilman OVAs I wish to review. It was first released on November 1, 1987 by King Records. Along with its sequel, The Demon Bird (デビルマン 妖鳥シレーヌ編), it is the closest thing to the original 1972 Devilman manga the world has experienced so far.

I decided to write this article because I consider Devilman to be extremely underestimated in comparison to other Nagai franchises [1], even though, in my opinion, it is his masterpiece. The article is full of spoilers, so be warned. Continue reading

Artistic worries and other stories (part 2)

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*The following post is full of artistic rant and nudity. You have been warned.*

Hello everyone! How are you doin’? It’s the second part of “Artistic worries”, our bimonthly series of articles dedicated to the various worries I have as an artist. Continue reading